Posted by CANbike on Fri, 15 Mar 2013

USB 3.0 Benchmark: Lexar Jumpdrive S73 (16GB, 64GB)

Benchmarked below are the USB 3.0 performance of the 16GB and 64GB Lexar Jumpdrive S73. Previous benchmarks were performed to measure the flash drives USB 2.0 peformance.

USB 3.0 Benchmark: Lexar Jumpdrive S73 – 16GB

Lexar-S73-16GB-01-thumb.jpgLexar-S73-16GB-02-thumb.jpgLexar-S73-16GB-03-thumb.jpgLexar-S73-16GB-04-thumb.jpgLexar-S73-16GB-05-thumb.jpgLexar-S73-16GB-06-thumb.jpg

Benchmarked below is the 16GB Lexar Jumpdrive S73 formated to have a single fat32 partition.

Device Information

fdisk -l  /dev/sdc

Disk /dev/sdc: 16.0 GB, 16022241280 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1947 cylinders, total 31293440 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdc1   *         128    31293439    15646656    c  W95 FAT32 (LBA)

Device Read Benchmark (USB 3.0)

hdparm -t  /dev/sdc1

/dev/sdc1:
 Timing buffered disk reads: 126 MB in  3.03 seconds =  41.63 MB/sec

Device Write Benchmark: 1MB x 1000 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=1M count=1000 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
1000+0 records in
1000+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 49.1599 s, 21.3 MB/s

Device Write Benchmark: 10MB x 100 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=10M count=100 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
100+0 records in
100+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 55.627 s, 18.9 MB/s

Device Write Benchmark: 100MB x 10 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=100M count=10 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
10+0 records in
10+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 56.5237 s, 18.6 MB/s

Device Write Benchmark: 500MB x 2 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=500M count=2 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
2+0 records in
2+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 54.8296 s, 19.1 MB/s

Device Write Benchmark: 1000MB x 1 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=1000M count=1 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
1+0 records in
1+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 56.0662 s, 18.7 MB/s

USB 3.0 Benchmark: Lexar Jumpdrive S73 – 64GB

CANbike Lexar-S73-64GB-01-thumb.jpgCANbike Lexar-S73-64GB-02-thumb.jpgCANbike Lexar-S73-64GB-03-thumb.jpg

Benchmarked below is the 64GB Lexar Jumpdrive S73 formated to have a single ext2 partition.

Device Information

fdisk -l  /dev/sdc

Disk /dev/sdc: 64.0 GB, 64021856256 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 7783 cylinders, total 125042688 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0000507a

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdc1            2048   125042687    62520320   83  Linux

Device Read Benchmark (USB 3.0)

hdparm -t  /dev/sdc1

/dev/sdc1:
 Timing buffered disk reads: 126 MB in  3.01 seconds =  41.92 MB/sec

Device Write Benchmark: 1MB x 1000 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=1M count=1000 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
1000+0 records in
1000+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 42.3057 s, 24.8 MB/s

Device Write Benchmark: 10MB x 100 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=10M count=100 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
100+0 records in
100+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 46.2662 s, 22.7 MB/s

Device Write Benchmark: 100MB x 10 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=100M count=10 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
10+0 records in
10+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 56.0786 s, 18.7 MB/s

Device Write Benchmark: 500MB x 2 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=500M count=2 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
2+0 records in
2+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 51.1079 s, 20.5 MB/s

Device Write Benchmark: 1000MB x 1 (USB 3.0)

dd if=/dev/zero of=tempfile bs=1000M count=1 conv=fdatasync,notrunc
1+0 records in
1+0 records out
1048576000 bytes (1.0 GB) copied, 59.8529 s, 17.5 MB/s

Final Words

Very little performance was gained by using a USB 3.0 port instead of USB 2.0 port. The read speed gained by a few MB/s while the write speed remained roughly the same. Despite the USB 3.0 marketing these flash drives were slow performing. However, they still make great USB 2.0 flash drives.